Keeping the bar low

Low?

Yes, that’s right – low.

Towards the beginning of this year I heard from a student was keen for God to use him in evangelism at his local university. But this semester he sent me an email in which he says that he would prefer his work to involve “Elders, Deacons, Church membership, Church discipline, a focus on all peoples etc.”  Now he can’t see himself doing the basic work of helping people into the kingdom and making disciples.

How am I supposed to answer that? I’m as signed-up as anybody on deacons, focus on all peoples, the lot! But just how complicated do we need to make it before we talk to people out loud about Jesus? How high does the bar need to be before you can jump into the wonderworld of evangelism? And how come baby Christians seem to be able to manage this better?

The man in John chapter nine had the answer: “One thing I do know. I was blind and now I can see.” The secret of good witness – indeed the power of the best witness – is keeping the bar low.

The key university number

Maybe it’s because those of us on the staff of Agapé  raise our own support that we get good at telling people how necessary we are. The truth is that what matters in reaching any university is the number students, however inexperienced, who acknowledge Jesus and recommend him – in front of their mates.

What you are doing

This past summer one of my international colleagues (Ken Cochrum) wrote up some research on the use of the internet by charitable organisations. He examined over a dozen such organisations. Which one was not making proper use of their international website – ours (www.ccci.org )! The one making the best use? Charity Water, at www.charitywater.org. Main difference? Our website tells you what we are doing but Charity Water tells you what you are doing. They expect you to be well capable of running a fundraising campaign on your own. They have fine-tuned the art of keeping the bar low.

Thankful for a low bar

Thankful for a low bar

 

 

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